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CAMERA BATTERY

Battery Wars
I often see battery wars on different camera sites over which battery is best for these classic 35mm cameras, but I never post comments in these wars. As a camera repairman my views are biased. When I see a film camera I wonder how much the curtain speeds have drifted, how accurate the shutter speeds are, how much the meters photocells have degraded, but not which battery is best. There are too many variables affecting a camera’s exposure accuracy and the battery is just one part of the whole. Unless a camera owner sends his camera to a shop to be serviced, his battery is not very important in relation to all the other parts of his camera that can also affect exposure.
Anyway, for people who are worried about such things I suggest they buy both the 1.5 volt battery and the 1.35 volt battery, and then run a test using their camera with slide film. Starting with a roll of (24) slide film, take 12 shots using one battery and 12 shots using the second battery, and then check the slides exposure results. A test like this takes into account all the camera's variables. It’s a simple test that will only cost you two batteries and one roll of film.

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CAMERA BATTERY
Back when 35mm film cameras were new the two main types of batteries were the 625 and the 76, with the letter A meaning alkaline and the letter S meaning silver. Today the part numbers for camera batteries changes so often that even I get confused. On the main page of ACR I've listed which battery each camera uses. Just locate your camera model to see what battery it needs. Listed below are the same batteries that are listed on the main page, plus some alternate 3.5 volt batteries for those who want to use the original factory voltage battery for their camera.




This is the 4pc Varta 1.5V Alkaline Battery Replaces V625U PX625A EPX625 4370 V13PX V625PX. This is the 625 battery I use for many film cameras. This battery needs to be replaced once a year even if it is still good. You don’t want to take the chance of a battery acid leak. A battery that leaks acid will wick acid straight up the wire connected to the battery compartment and damage the electronics in a camera. Replacing a five dollar battery once a year is cheaper than paying for the repair of an acid damaged camera meter.



This is the 2 x WeinCell MRB625 Replacement Battery for PX625/PX13. This is the older 625 1.35 volt battery that 35mm cameras used before it was replaced with the newer 625 1.5 volt battery. Some film camera meters work fine with the newer 625 1.5 volt battery and some cameras work better with the older 625 1.35 volt battery. My suggestion is to test both the 625 1.5 volt battery and the 625 1.35 volt battery in your camera with slide film and decide for yourself.



This is the4pc 1.55V Silver Oxide Battery Varta SP357 V357 4276 KS76 280-8 SR76E 1131SO. This is the 76 battery I use for many film cameras. This battery needs to be replaced once a year even if it is still good. You don’t want to take the chance of a battery acid leak.



This is the Exell MRB400 1.35V Zinc Air Battery Z400PX, E400N, EPX400, H-B, KX400, MRB400, PM400R, PX400, RM400, T400N, V400PX. This is the 400 battery used in early Pentax Spotmatics. This battery needs to be replaced once a year even if it is still good. You don’t want to take the chance of a battery acid leak.



This is 3x Duracell 28A 6V Battery Replacement for V4034PX, 4LR44,PX28A, 476AF, 476A. This battery is not for the older mechanical 35mm film cameras. This is for the AE-1, AE-1 Program, A-1, AT-1, AV-1 that were popular film cameras during the 70s. Many people still use them.